Arthur Pope - Nasturtiums at Fenway Court, 1919

Arthur Pope (Cleveland, 1880 - 1974, Westport, Massachusetts)

Nasturtiums at Fenway Court, 1919

Oil on canvas , 45 x 20 cm (17 11/16 x 7 7/8 in.)

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(Cleveland, 1880 - 1974, Westport, Massachusetts)

Object details

Accession number

P11s26

Primary Creator

Arthur Pope (Cleveland, 1880 - 1974, Westport, Massachusetts)

Full title

Nasturtiums at Fenway Court

Creation Date

1919

Provenance


Gift from the painter and original Gardner Museum trustee Arthur Pope to Isabella Stewart Gardner in 1919.

Dimensions

45 x 20 cm (17 11/16 x 7 7/8 in.)

Display Media

Oil on canvas

Web Commentary

On one of his spring visits to the Museum, Arthur Pope, a color theorist and professor of art at Harvard University, painted the annual spring display of bright orange flowering nasturtium vines. Isabella grew the plants at her home Green Hill, in Brookline, Massachusetts and hung them in the Courtyard around her birthday, April 14, a tradition which continues today.  

Permanent Gallery Location

Macknight Room

Bibliography

Morris Carter. Isabella Stewart Gardner and Fenway Court (Boston, 1925; Reprint, Boston, 1972), p. 225.
Philip Hendy. Catalogue of Exhibited Paintings and Drawings (Boston, 1931), pp. 273-74. (as 1919)
Gilbert Wendel Longstreet and Morris Carter. General Catalogue (Boston, 1935), p. 67. (as 1919)
Rollin Hadley. “Notes, Records, Comments.” Gardner Museum Calendar of Events 8, no. 15 (13 Dec. 1964), p. 2.
Philip Hendy. European and American Paintings in the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum (Boston, 1974), p. 188, ill. (as about 1919)

Rights and reproductions

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Commentary

On one of his spring visits to the Museum, Arthur Pope, a color theorist and professor of art at Harvard University, painted the annual spring display of bright orange flowering nasturtium vines. Isabella grew the plants at her home Green Hill, in Brookline, Massachusetts and hung them in the Courtyard around her birthday, April 14, a tradition which continues today.