Music

"Thank you so much for making these wonderful pieces available! I plan on listening to and sharing them all." --Podcast listener

About The Concert

Since 2006, the Gardner Museum's free classical podcast The Concert has made world-class performances recorded live at the museum available to listeners across the globe.

A new program is posted on the 1st and 15th of every month, so check the website often, subscribe to The Concert in iTunes or in any RSS reader to receive automatic updates. You can also download episodes of The Concert here on our site, as well as individual musical tracks by artist and composer through our online music library.

Current Episode

Episode 201: Haydn In the Countryside
Work for solo piano by Haydn performed by Sonia Chan on January 20, 2001 and work for string quartet by Haydn performed by Musicians from Marlboro on April 27, 2014.

  • Haydn: Sonata in C minor, No. 33
  • Haydn: String Quartet in B-flat Major, Op. 50, No. 1

In the 1770’s and 80’s, Haydn found himself in a situation familiar to many artists: how to balance his day job with his budding career? Granted, Haydn’s day job was musical as well. He was the Kapellmeister, the musical leader, of the Esterházy musical establishment.

But this steady gig came with strings attached: Haydn’s contract prohibited him from accepting commissions from any external source. The piano sonata written in 1771 demonstrates Haydn’s continuing musical growth. It was his very first piano piece to bear the “sonata” title, and it was longer and displayed more serious emotion than many of his earlier works.

In 1779, Haydn renegotiated his contract to allow him to accept outside employment, and things began to change. His Opus 50, number 1 string quartet was among the fruits of this highly creative and productive period. The Opus 50 quartets were commissioned in 1784 by Haydn’s new publisher, though it took him a while to complete them. He finally delivered the manuscript to his publisher in 1787.

Sharing

You are free to share and reproduce any of the Gardner’s audio files and pass this great classical music along to your friends and family. We only ask that you let people know where you found it, and don’t alter the recording or use it commercially. Visit Frequently Asked Questions for more information.

Acknowledgements

We’d like to thank the following individuals and institutions, whose help and support have made this project possible:

  • The musicians, without whose artistry, vision, and support we would not have been able to create this podcast.
  • The Berkman Center for their legal expertise in the complex and fascinating world of digital intellectual property.
  • Liberated Syndication for hosting our podcast.
  • Our talented recording engineer, Tom Stephenson of Emmanuel Recording.

We welcome your comments and suggestions! Email us at podcast@isgm.org.

 

Want more music from the Gardner Museum?

Listen to and download our free music podcast, The Concert